• Welcome to Literacyhead!

    A Literacyhead is someone who is intensely serious about exercising creative literacy, making connections across multiple literacies, pursuing thoughtful literacy as an individual and as a teacher, and constantly searching for ideas. Literacyheads may have expertise in different areas of literacy, but all are committed to children's literacy, passionate about the arts, incessant thinkers, and display a propensity for having fun
  • What is Literacyhead?

    We wanted to help teachers nurture their creative lives while they meet the demands of high accountability to which they are subject. We saw that art naturally differentiates lessons leading to more student engagement and less time planning. We love children's books and art, and the connections between the two make us positively giddy.
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  • Vocabulary Lessons

    In our "Visual Vocabulary" we select five words from a featured book in our Reading Lessons and provide four images that illustrate the meaning of each word. In accordance with vocabulary research, three of the images are examples of the word's meaning and the last one is a "non-example." In addition, we present a definition simple enough for students to remember and really "get" what the word means.
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  • High-frequency Word Lessons

    Here we've created sets of images and discussion prompts designed to help you teach high-frequency words with visual art. Use the six images and accompanying sentences to make concrete connections to these abstract words. These lessons pair wonderfully with vocabulary words, reading lessons, and writing lessons.
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Our Blog

  • In a post titled Sending Children Off to Do Big Things, we wrote about how exposing children to picture book biographies can help them better understand the connection between mindset, passion, and effort. In this post, we introduced readers to the Heart, Head, Hands and Feet Lesson from Reading Wellness which utilizes the following graphic organizer: Since [...]

  • After many requests for a Reading Wellness study guide, we are very excited to share with you the results of our efforts. We really wanted the finished product to support your close reading of the text, so we didn’t simply do a paint-by-numbers routine, but rather tried to make the study guide a complement to the book. In [...]

  • (Image credit Pixabay.com)   After listening to several subtle (and many not-so-subtle) hints from her twelve-year-old son, Nathan,  about being interested in playing soccer, Kim signed him up for a team.  A month separated soccer sign-ups and the beginning of the season and during this time,  Nathan worried–a lot. He worried that he’d be on [...]

  • In a post we wrote some time ago titled Solving Education’s Greatest Challenges: Unconventional Collaborations , we told the story of Stephane Tarnier, the French obstetrician responsible for inventing baby incubators.  We love this story as it illustrates how improving our work life sometimes means leaving our work life at work and doing something else [...]

  • Benchmarking, or taking running records with a series of books along a text gradient is a common practice in elementary schools. We are concerned, however, that these, as well as other measures of literacy, which consume large chunks of instructional time, have gaps that can influence early literacy instruction and interfere with later growth. For [...]

  • Writer’s workshop, a common instructional format for teaching writing, is based on the process in which “real” writers engage. A bedrock idea behind writer’s workshop is that these “real” writers take pieces of writing, usually on topics they choose to write about, through a series of stages–prewriting/brainstorming, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. The cycle is [...]

  • As the cold grips most of the United States, we begin today by asking you to imagine “unbearably humid” weather. (Does this ease the bite of the winter chill?)  If you were describing this to someone who had never before experienced it, what words would you use to help them understand what it’s like outside? [...]

  • On Monday, we posted a blog that described a couple of coaching contexts where we have worked in classrooms recently. As we work in schools, we are frequently reminded of the power of coaching in classrooms, and were pleased to see that, in its December issue, the American School Board Journal published a really thorough [...]

  • In this article “Personal Best”  from The New Yorker, Atul Gawande describes having some downtime while visiting Nantucket for a medical meeting. An avid tennis player, Gawande picked up his racket and headed to the court hoping to find someone willing to bat balls back and forth. The only person around happened to be a [...]

  • Like most, we have spent some time during the first few days of this month thinking about what we resolve to do better or differently in 2015. Returning to an idea we shared with you last new year, we have batted around words that embody the identities we wish to grow into.  We have basked [...]